Chat to ordinary people on cam no dating

Chat to ordinary people on cam no dating-15
The number of Stars transferred to the recipient, however, will remain the same, whether they respond to the message or not.In this way Luna’s financial incentives will be aligned with users’ goals at Stage IV in the exchanging of messages. Possibility of tipping in case of successful offline dates.

Luna intends to take a small fee for this transaction, but only if the recipient responds to the message within a window of a number of days yet to be determined.

If the recipient does not respond, or only responds after more than this number of days, this fee will be re-paid to the sender.

So let’s look through the white paper and see what they’ve got.

Most dating sites suffer from attention imbalance: men scrounge around for anyone willing to acknowledge their existence; women get inundated with countless desperate messages they don’t want.

In this way, rather than recreating disparities which exist between the goals of current dating platforms and their users, Luna’s financial incentives and user goals will coincide.

I can imagine all sorts of horrible misalignments between maximizing-number-of-responded-to-messages and maximizing user satisfaction, but for now I’ll just admit this seems nice and I appreciate the effort.Luna alludes to vague plans to “verify” profiles, which could mean anything from “you have to Photoshop a picture halfway convincingly” to “you have to get an actual pretty girl to help with your scam”. Better is their offer to provide data, including how often users respond to messages and how often users meet with other users: When choosing to attach Stars to his message, Bob should receive information such as the number of unread messages in Alice’s queue, an internally calculated reply quality indicator, and confirmation on whether Alice’s account is verified. I have bots pretending to be pretty women try to friend me on Facebook something like once a week, even though I have no idea what their endgame is or how this results in them making money.If Luna gives a real incentive for the scam, they’re going to have to beat Facebook pretty handily if they want to succeed here.Fees which comprise Luna’s revenue only occur in the case of successful communication.As described in 3.1, when a user receives and reads a message boosted with Stars, they also receive the Stars used to boost that message.If the market rate for a certain user’s messages were

I can imagine all sorts of horrible misalignments between maximizing-number-of-responded-to-messages and maximizing user satisfaction, but for now I’ll just admit this seems nice and I appreciate the effort.

Luna alludes to vague plans to “verify” profiles, which could mean anything from “you have to Photoshop a picture halfway convincingly” to “you have to get an actual pretty girl to help with your scam”. Better is their offer to provide data, including how often users respond to messages and how often users meet with other users: When choosing to attach Stars to his message, Bob should receive information such as the number of unread messages in Alice’s queue, an internally calculated reply quality indicator, and confirmation on whether Alice’s account is verified. I have bots pretending to be pretty women try to friend me on Facebook something like once a week, even though I have no idea what their endgame is or how this results in them making money.

If Luna gives a real incentive for the scam, they’re going to have to beat Facebook pretty handily if they want to succeed here.

Fees which comprise Luna’s revenue only occur in the case of successful communication.

As described in 3.1, when a user receives and reads a message boosted with Stars, they also receive the Stars used to boost that message.

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I can imagine all sorts of horrible misalignments between maximizing-number-of-responded-to-messages and maximizing user satisfaction, but for now I’ll just admit this seems nice and I appreciate the effort.Luna alludes to vague plans to “verify” profiles, which could mean anything from “you have to Photoshop a picture halfway convincingly” to “you have to get an actual pretty girl to help with your scam”. Better is their offer to provide data, including how often users respond to messages and how often users meet with other users: When choosing to attach Stars to his message, Bob should receive information such as the number of unread messages in Alice’s queue, an internally calculated reply quality indicator, and confirmation on whether Alice’s account is verified. I have bots pretending to be pretty women try to friend me on Facebook something like once a week, even though I have no idea what their endgame is or how this results in them making money.If Luna gives a real incentive for the scam, they’re going to have to beat Facebook pretty handily if they want to succeed here.Fees which comprise Luna’s revenue only occur in the case of successful communication.As described in 3.1, when a user receives and reads a message boosted with Stars, they also receive the Stars used to boost that message.If the market rate for a certain user’s messages were $1, then even the poorest person could afford to send a message to a potential soulmate.And even a well-off person might hesitate to send out a hundred messages a day, every day. Well, getting paid $100/day to read messages on a dating site doesn’t sound like the worst outcome.Even if that sounds a little cartoon-villainish, at the very least it doesn’t incentivize sites to do a good job matching you up.Luna claims that their model gives them a profit only when it succeeds: At Luna, we intend to structure the token economy in such a way that our system is rewarded when users achieve their goals, thus aligning our own incentives with those of our users and ensuring that all data, AI, and machine learning technology will be used to actually connect people…the approach consists of two parts: 1.Stars can be bought with dollars and vice versa, so popular users can actually earn money reading all the messages sent to them. Market forces are the known solution to the problem of connecting resources to their highest-value use.So if you treat user attention as a resource you can trust the market to allocate it optimally – in this case, to the guy who’s just realized he’s your soulmate, rather than the guy who’s spamming everyone with five dick pics.

, then even the poorest person could afford to send a message to a potential soulmate.And even a well-off person might hesitate to send out a hundred messages a day, every day. Well, getting paid 0/day to read messages on a dating site doesn’t sound like the worst outcome.Even if that sounds a little cartoon-villainish, at the very least it doesn’t incentivize sites to do a good job matching you up.Luna claims that their model gives them a profit only when it succeeds: At Luna, we intend to structure the token economy in such a way that our system is rewarded when users achieve their goals, thus aligning our own incentives with those of our users and ensuring that all data, AI, and machine learning technology will be used to actually connect people…the approach consists of two parts: 1.Stars can be bought with dollars and vice versa, so popular users can actually earn money reading all the messages sent to them. Market forces are the known solution to the problem of connecting resources to their highest-value use.So if you treat user attention as a resource you can trust the market to allocate it optimally – in this case, to the guy who’s just realized he’s your soulmate, rather than the guy who’s spamming everyone with five dick pics.

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